Becoming Ms. Jenaia
Simply put, there is nothing like it. Dressed in baggy overalls stuffed with tennis balls, poop bags, dog treats and leashes, I’m sitting on a folding chair in front of 45 six to eight year olds. The kids are sitting cross-legged on the floor, their eyes glued to my face as I read the story of a mother dog and her puppy who were abandoned at a garbage dump.
As the story, which is based on true events, unfolds their expressions are like mirrors, reflecting sadness, concern, disgust, laughter, and finally joy when the dogs are rescued and find their forever homes. The moment I read, “The End,” hands fly into the air as the kids compete to share their own stories and ask questions:
“Why did the people abandon their dogs?”
“What did the dogs eat when they were at the dump?”
“Did they have to fight the vultures for food?”
“Why do you think black things like vultures are so creepy?”
“What happened to the homeless men who lived at the dump?”
“Who’s helping the dogs now?”
As always, the kids knock my socks off. The questions they ask are smart, intuitive and full of compassion. They have thrown their hearts into the story and want answers that make sense. They want what I am hoping my stories give them – a way to see and be in the world that respects, values and cares for other creatures. I want them to learn that stories can help them figure out who they are and what really matters to them.
Afterwards, as the kids are gathering their things and putting on their backpacks, a six year old with red hair and freckles flings her arms around my waist, hugs me tight and says, “It was perfect.”
Like I said, there’s nothing like, but it took me 53 years and many sidetracks to discover that my love of animals, storytelling, drawing and kids could be harnessed to change the world. For most of those 53 years I was the proverbial odd person out. I never fit comfortably into the boxes corporate America and Japan assigned me.  I questioned authority, shared ideas that were not part of my job description, and expressed my opinions freely. In Japan, where women are expected to keep low and pretty profiles, I was told I had “a bad personality for a woman.” Back home in the states, I launched a career as a freelance journalist. The fact that I managed to support myself says more about my tenacity than my skill. Though I met and interviewed many remarkable people I was never happy telling other people’s stories.
Then in 2008 I made two huge course corrections. First, I came up with the concept for CritterKin – a loveable pack of mixed breed mutts and their leader Ms. Jenaia. Together they are on a mission to teach kids that animals (critters) are family (kin). Second, I met and agreed to work with Martin Keltz, the Emmy award winning producer of such acclaimed children’s programs as “The Magic School Bus,” “Goosebumps,” “Charles in Charge” and “The Babysitters Club.” Marty, as he insists on being called, has a long and fascinating history in children’s education. A former teacher, who pioneered using 8 millimeter filmmaking in classrooms, and editor of Media and Methods Magazine he went on to be the co-founder and president of Scholastic Productions. Since then he has followed the evolution of education with interest and concern. He firmly believes, and I agree with him, that we have an obligation to foster emotional as well as intellectual intelligence in kids.
Marty took one look at my outlines, character sketches and illustrations for CritterKin and said, “You’re Ms. Jenaia and you’ve got to do this!”

Fast forward to here and now. I’ve been embodying and giving voice to Ms. Jenaia for more than six months now, and the experience continues to startle and touch me. As Ms. Jenaia I live both as an illustrated cartoon and as a character who walks from the pages of books into children’s lives. The moment I put on those baggy, faded overalls, put my plastic daisy pen in my pocket, and clip my poop bags to my leash, I leave my day-to-day existence behind and step into the world I have imagined for and with the kids. Together we leap feet first into stories: embody the characters, practice their voices, draw their faces, and try to imagine what they are thinking and feeling. For our short time together I am Ms. Jenaia, the champion of dogs and the kids who love them. What more could a writer ask for?
See the kids: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gc6LQs265wU&feature=youtu.be
//

Becoming Ms. Jenaia

Simply put, there is nothing like it. Dressed in baggy overalls stuffed with tennis balls, poop bags, dog treats and leashes, I’m sitting on a folding chair in front of 45 six to eight year olds. The kids are sitting cross-legged on the floor, their eyes glued to my face as I read the story of a mother dog and her puppy who were abandoned at a garbage dump.

As the story, which is based on true events, unfolds their expressions are like mirrors, reflecting sadness, concern, disgust, laughter, and finally joy when the dogs are rescued and find their forever homes. The moment I read, “The End,” hands fly into the air as the kids compete to share their own stories and ask questions:

“Why did the people abandon their dogs?”

“What did the dogs eat when they were at the dump?”

“Did they have to fight the vultures for food?”

“Why do you think black things like vultures are so creepy?”

“What happened to the homeless men who lived at the dump?”

“Who’s helping the dogs now?”

As always, the kids knock my socks off. The questions they ask are smart, intuitive and full of compassion. They have thrown their hearts into the story and want answers that make sense. They want what I am hoping my stories give them – a way to see and be in the world that respects, values and cares for other creatures. I want them to learn that stories can help them figure out who they are and what really matters to them.

Afterwards, as the kids are gathering their things and putting on their backpacks, a six year old with red hair and freckles flings her arms around my waist, hugs me tight and says, “It was perfect.”

Like I said, there’s nothing like, but it took me 53 years and many sidetracks to discover that my love of animals, storytelling, drawing and kids could be harnessed to change the world. For most of those 53 years I was the proverbial odd person out. I never fit comfortably into the boxes corporate America and Japan assigned me.  I questioned authority, shared ideas that were not part of my job description, and expressed my opinions freely. In Japan, where women are expected to keep low and pretty profiles, I was told I had “a bad personality for a woman.” Back home in the states, I launched a career as a freelance journalist. The fact that I managed to support myself says more about my tenacity than my skill. Though I met and interviewed many remarkable people I was never happy telling other people’s stories.

Then in 2008 I made two huge course corrections. First, I came up with the concept for CritterKin – a loveable pack of mixed breed mutts and their leader Ms. Jenaia. Together they are on a mission to teach kids that animals (critters) are family (kin). Second, I met and agreed to work with Martin Keltz, the Emmy award winning producer of such acclaimed children’s programs as “The Magic School Bus,” “Goosebumps,” “Charles in Charge” and “The Babysitters Club.” Marty, as he insists on being called, has a long and fascinating history in children’s education. A former teacher, who pioneered using 8 millimeter filmmaking in classrooms, and editor of Media and Methods Magazine he went on to be the co-founder and president of Scholastic Productions. Since then he has followed the evolution of education with interest and concern. He firmly believes, and I agree with him, that we have an obligation to foster emotional as well as intellectual intelligence in kids.

Marty took one look at my outlines, character sketches and illustrations for CritterKin and said, “You’re Ms. Jenaia and you’ve got to do this!”

Fast forward to here and now. I’ve been embodying and giving voice to Ms. Jenaia for more than six months now, and the experience continues to startle and touch me. As Ms. Jenaia I live both as an illustrated cartoon and as a character who walks from the pages of books into children’s lives. The moment I put on those baggy, faded overalls, put my plastic daisy pen in my pocket, and clip my poop bags to my leash, I leave my day-to-day existence behind and step into the world I have imagined for and with the kids. Together we leap feet first into stories: embody the characters, practice their voices, draw their faces, and try to imagine what they are thinking and feeling. For our short time together I am Ms. Jenaia, the champion of dogs and the kids who love them. What more could a writer ask for?

See the kids: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gc6LQs265wU&feature=youtu.be

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Super Lance!
Lance here. I’ve been thinking about people and their super powers. To dogs it often seems like they can do anything - rescue a dog from a terrible life, give food, toys, a comfy bed, and best of all love. So the big question is, what keeps people from using their super powers?  
I want to encourage kids to follow my example and become superheroes too! There are lots of ways to find and use your super powers:
Visit your local shelter and ask how you can help 
Learn about pit bulls (like me) and help stop negative myths about them
Encourage your friends and family to adopt not shop for a dog
Donate supplies to a local shelter or rescue group
Say thank you to the people working in shelters and rescues. Their jobs are hard and they need love too.
Report animal abuse if you see it
If you find a lost pet, try to find its owner before taking it to the shelter
Learn how to prevent too many animals from being born
Raise money to help feed homeless pets
Write letters to the editor of your paper to express your opinion about what can be done to help homeless animals 
Create posters and flyers about how to take care of pets
Dress as a pit bull superhero for Halloween and tell everyone you know that you are on a mission to rescue and help homeless pets find their forever homes.
Below are some good resources:
1. How to find homes for homeless pets: http://bit.ly/17n6FJs
2. Student Action: http://bit.ly/ifRHYz
3. Kids Helping Homeless Animals: http://yhoo.it/1anTEOE
If you’d like to learn more about Lance’s story, you can get a copy of “Meet the Mutts” here: http://www.critterkin.com/meet-the-mutts.html
To get your own Superhero t-shirt with Lance on the front click here:http://www.cafepress.com/shopcritterkin.1010056868
//

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Super Lance!

Lance here. I’ve been thinking about people and their super powers. To dogs it often seems like they can do anything - rescue a dog from a terrible life, give food, toys, a comfy bed, and best of all love. So the big question is, what keeps people from using their super powers?  

I want to encourage kids to follow my example and become superheroes too! There are lots of ways to find and use your super powers:

  • Visit your local shelter and ask how you can help 
  • Learn about pit bulls (like me) and help stop negative myths about them
  • Encourage your friends and family to adopt not shop for a dog
  • Donate supplies to a local shelter or rescue group
  • Say thank you to the people working in shelters and rescues. Their jobs are hard and they need love too.
  • Report animal abuse if you see it
  • If you find a lost pet, try to find its owner before taking it to the shelter
  • Learn how to prevent too many animals from being born
  • Raise money to help feed homeless pets
  • Write letters to the editor of your paper to express your opinion about what can be done to help homeless animals 
  • Create posters and flyers about how to take care of pets
  • Dress as a pit bull superhero for Halloween and tell everyone you know that you are on a mission to rescue and help homeless pets find their forever homes.

Below are some good resources:

1. How to find homes for homeless pets: http://bit.ly/17n6FJs

2. Student Action: http://bit.ly/ifRHYz

3. Kids Helping Homeless Animals: http://yhoo.it/1anTEOE

If you’d like to learn more about Lance’s story, you can get a copy of “Meet the Mutts” here: http://www.critterkin.com/meet-the-mutts.html

To get your own Superhero t-shirt with Lance on the front click here:
http://www.cafepress.com/shopcritterkin.1010056868

Become a CritterKin Superhero
Lance here. As CritterKin’s superhero in training and spokesmutt for pit bulls, it’s my job to debunk stereotypes about dogs like me.
October is a BIG month for pit bulls. Not only is the whole month devoted to pit bulls, but today (Saturday, October 26th) is national pit bull awareness day and Halloween is right around the corner.
After giving it some thought, I decided to create an outfit that I could wear not only on Halloween but all year round as well. Simply put, I want to be a superhero for my breed, doing my best to end stereotypes and myths about the bully breeds, fight BSL, and help rescue, rehabilitate and rehome dogs when I can.  
Like Ms. Jenaia and the other members of the CritterKin pack, I believe the key to ending cruel practices like dog fighting and puppy mills is education. People who learn compassion, empathy and respect for all animals as children grow up to be kind and caring adults.
I hope that you will purchase and wear my “Superhero in Training T-shirt” proudly, since a portion of all CritterKin sales goes to help the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) rescue, rehabilitate and find homes for dogs around the world. To get your tee, visit: http://www.cafepress.com/shopcritterkin/10530488
Fun Facts About Pit Bulls
There is no such thing as a pit bull!  The term “pit bull” is used to describe dogs with similar physical characteristics.  Some of the breeds that are often called pit bulls include: American Staffordshire Terrier, the American Pit Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, the Bull Terrier, and the American Bulldog.
This statement from the dedicated folks at Pit Bull Rescue Central beautifully sums up my breed: “By nature, pit bulls are intelligent, fun loving, and affectionate. Pit bulls are energetic, agile, and strong. They are also very resourceful and driven. Determination is one of their most notable traits: They put their heart and soul into whatever they set out to do, whether it is escaping an inadequately fenced yard to explore the neighborhood, destroying your new couch if left home alone without a proper outlet to combat boredom, or climbing into your lap to shower you with kisses!”
If you’d like to know more about my specific story, get a copy of “Meet the Mutts: here: http://www.amazon.com/Meet-Mutts-A-CritterKin-Tale-ebook/dp/B00F8PGYCK. And of course feel free to send me fan mail courtesy of Ms. Jenaia: jenaia@startledcat.com

I just LOVE attention!

//

Become a CritterKin Superhero

Lance here. As CritterKin’s superhero in training and spokesmutt for pit bulls, it’s my job to debunk stereotypes about dogs like me.

October is a BIG month for pit bulls. Not only is the whole month devoted to pit bulls, but today (Saturday, October 26th) is national pit bull awareness day and Halloween is right around the corner.

After giving it some thought, I decided to create an outfit that I could wear not only on Halloween but all year round as well. Simply put, I want to be a superhero for my breed, doing my best to end stereotypes and myths about the bully breeds, fight BSL, and help rescue, rehabilitate and rehome dogs when I can.  

Like Ms. Jenaia and the other members of the CritterKin pack, I believe the key to ending cruel practices like dog fighting and puppy mills is education. People who learn compassion, empathy and respect for all animals as children grow up to be kind and caring adults.

I hope that you will purchase and wear my “Superhero in Training T-shirt” proudly, since a portion of all CritterKin sales goes to help the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) rescue, rehabilitate and find homes for dogs around the world. To get your tee, visit: http://www.cafepress.com/shopcritterkin/10530488

Fun Facts About Pit Bulls

There is no such thing as a pit bull!  The term “pit bull” is used to describe dogs with similar physical characteristics.  Some of the breeds that are often called pit bulls include: American Staffordshire Terrier, the American Pit Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, the Bull Terrier, and the American Bulldog.

This statement from the dedicated folks at Pit Bull Rescue Central beautifully sums up my breed: “By nature, pit bulls are intelligent, fun loving, and affectionate. Pit bulls are energetic, agile, and strong. They are also very resourceful and driven. Determination is one of their most notable traits: They put their heart and soul into whatever they set out to do, whether it is escaping an inadequately fenced yard to explore the neighborhood, destroying your new couch if left home alone without a proper outlet to combat boredom, or climbing into your lap to shower you with kisses!

If you’d like to know more about my specific story, get a copy of “Meet the Mutts: here: http://www.amazon.com/Meet-Mutts-A-CritterKin-Tale-ebook/dp/B00F8PGYCK. And of course feel free to send me fan mail courtesy of Ms. Jenaia: jenaia@startledcat.com

I just LOVE attention!

Meet the Mutts is Here!
The latest book in the CritterKin series hit the shelves today and our tails are wagging! You can get your own copy of the book here: http://amzn.to/H8WYE8
Then stop by our Pinterest page to see the story we created of the making of the Meet the Mutts cover in pictures: http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/meet-the-mutts-cover-story/
//

Meet the Mutts is Here!

The latest book in the CritterKin series hit the shelves today and our tails are wagging! You can get your own copy of the book here: http://amzn.to/H8WYE8

Then stop by our Pinterest page to see the story we created of the making of the Meet the Mutts cover in pictures: http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/meet-the-mutts-cover-story/

Taking It to the Streets (of Iowa)
Sprout here. Most of you probably know me from Poco a Poco, the book that tells the story of how my mother and I were rescued from a garbage dump in Cozumel, Mexico. As you can see, I’m all grown up now, but my story is being shared with kids all over the world. Which brings me to the purpose of this post – I’ve got news!
Ms. Jenaia and the CritterKin pack recently met a red-haired lady librarian named Ms. Shannon. Ms. Jenaia was impressed by her writing, tweeting, presentation and research skills (all the usual people stuff), but I like the way her eyes smile and that she gives good belly rubs.  
You can learn more about Ms. Shannon and her terrific programs here: http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/. Be sure to read her bio (she’s a bit of a big mucky muck in the education world), and watch some of the videos her students have made. I love the new one about bullying!
Ms. Jenaia will be reading Poco a Poco to Ms. Shannon’s first graders tomorrow at 12:00 (CST). We will be live streaming the reading via a Google On Air Hangout, so you can join too!  You will be able to see pictures of me, my mom, the vultures at the dump, and the people who saved us. Plus, you can ask questions and learn about the CritterKin Kids reading program and other fun stuff.
We will be posting the link to the live stream tomorrow at about 11:55 on:
1. CritterKin’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Critterkin
2. CritterKin’s Twitter page: https://twitter.com/CritterKin
2. Ms. Shannon’s Twitter page: https://twitter.com/shannonmmiller
If you have any questions, be sure to email me via Ms. Jenaia at: Jenaia@startledcat.com.
See you there!Sprout

//

Taking It to the Streets (of Iowa)

Sprout here. Most of you probably know me from Poco a Poco, the book that tells the story of how my mother and I were rescued from a garbage dump in Cozumel, Mexico. As you can see, I’m all grown up now, but my story is being shared with kids all over the world. Which brings me to the purpose of this post – I’ve got news!

Ms. Jenaia and the CritterKin pack recently met a red-haired lady librarian named Ms. Shannon. Ms. Jenaia was impressed by her writing, tweeting, presentation and research skills (all the usual people stuff), but I like the way her eyes smile and that she gives good belly rubs.  

You can learn more about Ms. Shannon and her terrific programs here: http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/. Be sure to read her bio (she’s a bit of a big mucky muck in the education world), and watch some of the videos her students have made. I love the new one about bullying!

Ms. Jenaia will be reading Poco a Poco to Ms. Shannon’s first graders tomorrow at 12:00 (CST). We will be live streaming the reading via a Google On Air Hangout, so you can join too!  You will be able to see pictures of me, my mom, the vultures at the dump, and the people who saved us. Plus, you can ask questions and learn about the CritterKin Kids reading program and other fun stuff.

We will be posting the link to the live stream tomorrow at about 11:55 on:

1. CritterKin’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Critterkin

2. CritterKin’s Twitter page: https://twitter.com/CritterKin

2. Ms. Shannon’s Twitter page: https://twitter.com/shannonmmiller

If you have any questions, be sure to email me via Ms. Jenaia at: Jenaia@startledcat.com.

See you there!
Sprout

CritterKin Mutts Strut Their Stuff for Halloween

It all started when Ms. Jenaia brought up Halloween. To be fair, she was just trying to prepare us for the strange noises, smells and behavior of kids in the neighborhood and to warn us about staying close to home.

However, as is often the case, Mariah wanted to discus the possibility of dressing up (she does love fashion) and it wasn’t long before we each were trying on and picking out costumes. The results of our endeavors can be seen on our Pinterest board: http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/free-halloween-stuff-for-kids/ Check out the fun posters available to kids for free.  

You can also get fun shirts and other CritterKin Halloween gear to wear to our upcoming Halloween Party in honor of the launch of the new CritterKin book, “Meet the Mutts.” Here’s the store (click on Halloween): http://www.cafepress.com/shopcritterkin

We’ll be posting the time and place for the party in the next day or so. Here’s a hint. It will be virtual so you can attend from almost anywhere! Stay tuned!

Chocolate Cupcake Day
Sprout here with some disturbing news. Today is “Chocolate Cupcake Day,” and I am not allowed to celebrate. As my CritterKin pack mate Clue would say, “Unfair, unfair, unfair!”
According to Ms. Jenaia, chocolate is very very bad for dogs. So bad that I could get sick and even die if I indulged. Therefore I have reluctantly agreed to avoid any chocolate cupcakes that cross my path. However, I do think it’s rather inconsiderate of humans to celebrate a food their dogs cannot enjoy too.
Therefore, I would like to propose that October 18th henceforth be known as “Un-Chocolate Cupcake Day for Dogs.”  As you know, I am a bit of a cupcake and muffin aficionado, so I decided to find and post an appropriately decadent recipe. The one I chose features another of my favorite foods, carob, and comes to you courtesy of Kevyn Matthews, the fabulous “Dog Chef.” 
I hope you will share your own recipes so that when Un-Chocolate Cupcake Day for Dogs rolls around next year on October 18th we won’t even blink an eye when someone mentions chocolate!
Faux Choco Muffins by The Dog Chef
Preheat oven to 375 degrees
Ingredients:1 1/2 cups ground carrots1 cup chick pea flour1/2 cup olive oil1/2 cup molasses2 tablespoons carob powder2 eggsGarnish: organic peanut butter
Grind carrots in food processor and set aside.
Beat two eggs and add in olive oil, molasses and ground carrot. Mix well.
Stir in flour, and carob powder and mix well.  
Fill non-stick muffin pans three quarters full to allow muffins space to rise.
Bake at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes until done.
Allow the muffins to cool, then top them with organic peanut butter and sprinkle carob powder on top.
P.S. Feel free to share with your people if they ask nicely.
//

Chocolate Cupcake Day

Sprout here with some disturbing news. Today is “Chocolate Cupcake Day,” and I am not allowed to celebrate. As my CritterKin pack mate Clue would say, “Unfair, unfair, unfair!”

According to Ms. Jenaia, chocolate is very very bad for dogs. So bad that I could get sick and even die if I indulged. Therefore I have reluctantly agreed to avoid any chocolate cupcakes that cross my path. However, I do think it’s rather inconsiderate of humans to celebrate a food their dogs cannot enjoy too.

Therefore, I would like to propose that October 18th henceforth be known as “Un-Chocolate Cupcake Day for Dogs.”  As you know, I am a bit of a cupcake and muffin aficionado, so I decided to find and post an appropriately decadent recipe. The one I chose features another of my favorite foods, carob, and comes to you courtesy of Kevyn Matthews, the fabulous “Dog Chef.” 

I hope you will share your own recipes so that when Un-Chocolate Cupcake Day for Dogs rolls around next year on October 18th we won’t even blink an eye when someone mentions chocolate!

Faux Choco Muffins by The Dog Chef

Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups ground carrots
1 cup chick pea flour
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup molasses
2 tablespoons carob powder
2 eggs
Garnish: organic peanut butter

  • Grind carrots in food processor and set aside.
  • Beat two eggs and add in olive oil, molasses and ground carrot. Mix well.
  • Stir in flour, and carob powder and mix well.  
  • Fill non-stick muffin pans three quarters full to allow muffins space to rise.
  • Bake at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes until done.
  • Allow the muffins to cool, then top them with organic peanut butter and sprinkle carob powder on top.

P.S. Feel free to share with your people if they ask nicely.

Sprout Tries Out for Best Canine Halloween Costume
Would you vote for him?  Here are the other contenders: http://www.ilovedogfriendly.com/2013/10/top-10-halloween-costumes-dogs/#.Ulx1YVCmh8F
//

Sprout Tries Out for Best Canine Halloween Costume

Would you vote for him?  Here are the other contenders: http://www.ilovedogfriendly.com/2013/10/top-10-halloween-costumes-dogs/#.Ulx1YVCmh8F

Help CritterKin Recruit Kids as Animal Advocates
There’s no better way to help get kids excited about animal protection, rescue and adoption than CritterKin Tales. Kids love reading and interacting with the characters and stories, and parents love that their kids are learning empathy, compassion and respect.

Download your FREE CritterKin book and media resources your organization can use to spread the word here: http://www.critterkin.com/resources-media.html
//

Help CritterKin Recruit Kids as Animal Advocates

There’s no better way to help get kids excited about animal protection, rescue and adoption than CritterKin Tales. Kids love reading and interacting with the characters and stories, and parents love that their kids are learning empathy, compassion and respect.

Download your FREE CritterKin book and media resources your organization can use to spread the word here: http://www.critterkin.com/resources-media.html

"For there was nothing sweeter thanhis peace when at rest.
For there was nothing brisker thanhis life whenin motion.
For he was of the tribe of Wolf.”        - Mary Oliver
Great Gray Mother Wolf’s Message:http://www.critterkin.com/ifaw.html
//

"For there was nothing sweeter than
his peace 
when at rest.

For there was nothing brisker than
his life when
in motion.

For he was of the tribe of Wolf.”        - Mary Oliver

Great Gray Mother Wolf’s Message:http://www.critterkin.com/ifaw.html

Rescued Is Our Favorite Breed!
October is “Adopt a Shelter Dog Month.” Let’s see if we can get our kids asking for a “rescue” instead of a puppy for Christmas.
http://www.critterkin.com/ifaw.html
//

Rescued Is Our Favorite Breed!

October is “Adopt a Shelter Dog Month.” Let’s see if we can get our kids asking for a “rescue” instead of a puppy for Christmas.

http://www.critterkin.com/ifaw.html

Pulitzer Prize Winner Mary Oliver’s New Book: “Dog Songs”  
"A sweet golden retriever of a book that curls up with the reader. It’s also about love, impermanence and the tears in things."  - NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/1007/books/mary-olivers-dog-songs-finds-poetry-in-friends.html?_r=0
Can hardly wait!
//

Pulitzer Prize Winner Mary Oliver’s New Book: “Dog Songs”  

"A sweet golden retriever of a book that curls up with the reader. It’s also about love, impermanence and the tears in things."  - NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/1007/books/mary-olivers-dog-songs-finds-poetry-in-friends.html?_r=0

Can hardly wait!

In honor World Animal Day 2013, Great Gray Mother Wolf says, “Open your hearts and minds and remember animals (critters) are family (kin).”
//

In honor World Animal Day 2013, Great Gray Mother Wolf says, “Open your hearts and minds and remember animals (critters) are family (kin).”

Thank You IFAW for Believing in CritterKin and Providing Inspiration, Images and Endless Fact Checking!Read the IFAW blog and watch the video here:http://t.co/vsTnhm0Ycx
And see more images from the reading here: http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/critterkin-poco-a-poco-reading-august-2013/
//

Thank You IFAW for Believing in CritterKin and Providing Inspiration, Images and Endless Fact Checking!

Read the IFAW blog and watch the video here:http://t.co/vsTnhm0Ycx

And see more images from the reading here: http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/critterkin-poco-a-poco-reading-august-2013/

Ms. Jenaia did a reading of the first CritterKin tale, “Poco a Poco” for the kids at “The Farm” in Chapel Hill, NC. See their smiling faces and the video of the event here:
http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/critterkin-poco-a-poco-reading-august-2013/
//

Ms. Jenaia did a reading of the first CritterKin tale, “Poco a Poco” for the kids at “The Farm” in Chapel Hill, NC. See their smiling faces and the video of the event here:

http://www.pinterest.com/critterkin/critterkin-poco-a-poco-reading-august-2013/